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Customer Service> Glossary of Terms
Draper's & Damon's
 

 
Glossary of Terms


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Acetate:
    A manufactured fiber formed by compound of cellulose, refined from cotton linters and/or wood pulp, and acedic acid that has been extruded through a spinneret and then hardened.

Acrylic:
    A fiber. A liquid derivative of natural gas and air. When processed it has durability, strength and good draping qualities.

A-line:
    A style named for the "A" shape it forms on the figure.

Alpaca:
    A natural hair fiber from the Alpaca Sheep.

Angora:
    Fine, soft, fuzzy fabric made of Angora wool.

Appliqué:
    (ap-li-kay) Decoration laid on and applied to another surface, as a band or separate design of petals, leaves, figurines, etc.

Appliqué Embroidery:
    Motif or design applied to the fabric with stitches. The design itself is usually a separate fabric piece.

Argyle:
    A popular design for knitted fabrics. Usually 2 or 3 colors appear in a diamond shaped plaid pattern.

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Baby French Terry:
    Medium weight, soft, cotton-type fabric with low twist yarns forming very small surface loops. The side with the loops is usually on the inside, and the smooth side faces out. It is much softer and thinner than terry cloth, which is used for towels and robes. French terry is commonly used in sportswear. It resists wrinkles and is very packable.

Back Kick Pleat:
    Back pleat used to ease narrow skirt. (see also pleat)

Back Slit:
    An opening, usually 3" to 6", at the back hem of a skirt to ease movement in an otherwise narrow skirt.

Band:
    Strip of fabric used to hold, ornament or complete any part of the garment or accessory. It is most commonly seen as the banded hem at the bottom of a polo shirt.

Basket Weave:
    Plain weave with two or more yarns used as one.

Bast Fiber:
    Strong, soft, woody fibers, like flax, jute, hemp and ramie.

Batiste:
    Medium weight, plain weave fabric, usually made of cotton or cotton blends.

Battenburg Lace:
    A bold lace, made by hand or machine, of linen braid, or tape, and linen thread brought together to form various designs.

Bead Work:
    Beads applied as trim, or allover design, to form a pattern or design.

Bemberg:
    Textured, brushed rayon. It has a silky texture and a sueded-silk appearance. It does not easily wrinkle.

Besom Pockets:
    Pockets that have a finished appearance similar to finer men's suit pockets, with extra "buttonhole seams" at the pocket entrance. They give a smooth, tailored appearance and add value. Besom pockets are most often on a jacket front, but can also appear on pants.

Biadere:
    Refers to the all-around pattern.

Bias:
    When a fabric is cut on the true diagonal, rather than straight across. A bias cut affects both the pattern and the way the fabric hangs.

Big Shirt:
    A slightly oversized shirt that can usually be worn as either a shirt or jacket.

Bind:
    To enclose an edge in a bias binding or band for decoration, extra strength, or protection.

Bird's Eye Knit:
    A salt and pepper color effect on the back of a double knit fabric.

Blanket Jacket:
    A jacket made out of woven material normally used as a covering or a layer.

Blazer:
    A light sports jacket, often in a solid color.

Blouson:
    A long waisted blouse that is banded at the bottom with a covered elastic band. It usually extends slightly below the waist, but can be worn at the waist via the elastic.

Bodice:
    Area of dress or blouse extending from neckline to waistline or just slightly below.

Bomber Style Jacket:
    An easy fitting style of jacket, which is hip length, gathered into a band at the lower edge, and zippered.

Border Print:
    Design printed along the selvage (bound edge) of the fabric, or printed parallel to the selvage.

Bordered Print/Bordered Fabric:
    Fabric woven or printed with a border that is used as a trimming or finish in making a garment.

Boucle:
    Woven or knitted so that the surface has a looped or knotted appearance. It does not wrinkle.

Braid/Braid Trim:
    Narrow cord-like strip of flat tape woven of silk, wool, linen, etc.; used for trimming, biding, designs, outlines.

Breast Pocket:
    A pocket located on the upper half of the front of a shirt, blouse or jacket.

Brocade:
    Heavy, luxurious fabric with slightly raised jacquard design. Used for apparel, decorative fabrics, etc.

Broomstick Skirt:
    Full skirt of lightweight cotton (often calico print), which when washed is folded tightly around a broomstick and tied with a string. When dry it has tiny vertical wrinkles.

Burnout Pattern Tab:
    The foundation fabric is sheer. A slightly textured layer.

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Cable Knit:
    Knit to produce heavy cord in raised loop stripe.

Caftan:
    Long, full robe with slit neckline.

Calendering:
    Process for finishing fabrics in which such special effects as high luster, glazing, embossing, and moiré are used to make smooth and glossy, or wavy material.

Calico:
    A tightly woven cotton type fabric with an all over print, usually a small floral pattern on a contrasting background color.

Camisole:
    Lingerie definition: waist length gathered top with straps, trimmed with lace or embroidery. Similar to the top half of a slip. Garment definition: a short-bodice top, usually with a straight top and straps that are wide enough to cover bra straps. It is always sleeveless.

Campshirt:
    A button front shirt with a fold down collar, sometimes made to be worn over a tank.

Candlewicking:
    A type of embroidery in which the top threads are thicker and more visible, giving the fabric a bold embroidered texture.

Canvas:
    Heavy, plain-weave, cotton type durable fabric. Often used for totes and handbags.

Cap Sleeve:
    Created by extending the shoulder line to "cap" the shoulder of a simple shell. It gives more coverage than a sleeveless shell, but not as much as a normal short sleeve.

Cape Coat:
    Sleeveless outer garment of any length hanging loosely from shoulders; usually covering back, shoulders, and arms.

Capri Pants:
    Tapered pants with bottom hem falling at about mid-calf.

Cardigan Jacket:
    Boxy jacket, often of a knit material, that can be worn open, or closed with buttons or toggles.

Cascade:
    Lace or other trimming arranged to fall vertically from neckline, sleeves, or other part of a garment in zigzag.

Cashmere:
    Soft, fine wool.

Challis:
    (sha-lee) Lightweight, plain weave, slightly brushed, supple, woolen or cotton-type fabric, usually with a printed design. Used for dresses, scarves, infants' wear.

Chambray:
    A fine quality firm, lightweight, washable cotton fabric, having a warp or white filling.

Chanel Style Jacket:
    A long sleeved, collarless, boxy jacket. It often has contrasting trim around the edges.

Charmeuze:
    (shar-muz) Trade name for soft, lightweight fabric in satin weave with twilled back.

Checkered Pattern:
    A pattern in squares of any size, woven or appliqued.

Chemise Dress:
    A simple dress that hangs straight from the shoulders. It usually has no darts or shaping seams.

Chenille:
    (shen-neel) Silk, rayon, cotton, wool, or worsted cord having tufted velvet-like pile protruding all around, similar in appearance to a fuzzy caterpillar.

Chiffon:
    (shi-fawn) Soft, delicately sheer fabric in a plain weave. It is usually soft, but can be chemically treated to have a stiff finish.

Chino:
    Medium weight, closely woven, twill weave, cotton-type fabric with a slight shine. Used for uniforms, slacks, etc.

Chintz:
    A printed and glazed cotton fabric usually of bright colors.

Circle Skirt:
    Skirt in a circular shape.

Clamdigger Pants:
    Same as capri pants. Tapered pants with the hem falling at about the mid-calf.

Clip Jacquard:
    Similar to a burnout fabric (pattern defined by "burned out" sheer areas), the jacquard pattern has been "clipped" into patterned jacquard squares on sheer fabric.

Coat Dress:
    Tailored dress, usually fitted, with coat type of front closing and coat-like lines.

Collage:
    Fabric sewn together in patches of several prints, sizes, colors, etc.

Colorblock:
    Colors applied in block printing, often as an overlay on designs.

Companion Fabrics:
    Two or more fabrics designed to be used together.

Convertible Collar:
    Collar that can be worn in more than one way. Generally up (against the neck), or flat.

Cording:
    Cable cord, covered with bias (diagonal cut) fabric, to make a corded edge or trim. It is often done with the same fabric as the garment, or in a contrasting color.

Corduroy:
    Medium weight cotton fabric with lengthwise nap-like cords (called wales) produced by the cutting of pile filling yarns. Used for slacks, jackets, etc.

Covered Button:
    Button covered with fabric.

Cowl Neck:
    Soft Fold or drape of material at front neckline.

Crepe:
    A light soft thin fabric of silk, cotton, wool, or another fiber, with a crinkled surface.

Crepe de Chine:
    (krep-de-sheen) A light to medium weight fine crepe (crinkled) fabric with crepe filament yarns.

Crepe-back Satin:
    Satin fabric with crepe surface on dull side. (see also satin)

Crepon:
    A D&D term for a lightweight crepe fabric. Crepe is slightly dimpled, usually rayon or polyester. The light dimpling helps to resist wrinkles.

Crinoline:
    Lightweight, plain weave, stiffened fabric with a low yarn count.

Cutwork:
    Tiny holes are cut in the fabric in a decorative design. Each hole’s edges are then embroidered like a buttonhole. It provides great shoe ventilation, and makes fabric look light and airy.

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Damask:
    Glossy, jacquard fabric.

Dart:
    A short, tapered seam used to fit a garment. Darts are usually at the bust and at the rear top of pants.

Denim:
    Medium weight, twill weave, cotton-type fabric. Warp is colored, filling is white or gray. Traditional color is indigo blue, which usually begins to fade after only several washings. Used for slacks, work clothes, etc.

Diamond Pattern:
    A lozenge shape having four equal sides, with horizontal and vertical points.

Dirndle Skirt:
    (durn-del) A straight skirt, gathered or pleated and sewn at a waist band or bodice.

Dobby:
    Type of woven fabric that contains simple geometric forms or motifs, where the design on the fabric is created in the weaving process.

Dolman Sleeve:
    Sleeve made very wide at armhole, fitted at wrist. Gives appearance of a cape.

Donegal Tweed:
    Medium to heavy plain or twill weave fabric finish in which colorful yarn slubs are woven in the fabric.

Dotted Swiss:
    Lightweight, sheer cotton or cotton blend fabric with a small dot flock-like pattern either printed on the surface of the fabric or woven into the fabric.

Double-Breasted:
    Said of the front of a garment, usually a coat or jacket, that overlaps enough for a double row of buttons.

Double Knit:
    A specialty type of rib-knit fabric. Usually close stitched with a pattern or design effect. Generally thicker, heavier, and more stable than jersey.

Double Pique:
    (pee-kay) A double knit fabric stamped with a honeycomb effect texture.

Douppioni:
    (doo-pee-oni) Silk douppioni is a silk fabric that is woven in such a way that it has an irregular subtle texture.

Drawstring Hem:
    String or cord is inserted in a casing, or a small hem, to gather the fabric. Most commonly seen on jackets.

Drop Yoke Skirt:
    Skirt which is fitted at hip area with yoke to which skirt is attached.

Duchess Satin:
    Heavy, lustrous, rich-looking satin weave fabric.

Duck:
    Tightly woven heavy, plain-weave, bottom-weight fabric with a hard, durable finish. Usually made of cotton.

Dye-To-Match:
    Two different fabrics, usually of different fibers, are dyed to be exactly the same color and tone.

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Elasthane:
    Another word for spandex. Stretchy.

Embellished:
    Made beautiful by ornamentation. Having added detail.

Embossing:
    A surface effect achieved on fabric by means of passing cloth through a series of engraved rollers that impart figures or designs to its surface. Rollers work through heat and pressure.

Embroidery:
    Ornamental needlework consisting of designs worked on fabrics with various types of threads.

Empire Waist Dress:
    Dress in which the waistline hits just below the bust. A flattering style on most figures.

Espadrille:
    A shoe, usually with a canvas upper, and a flexible, tapered sole. It can also be leather, and usually has a woven sisal sole.

Eyelet:
    Type of fabric that contains patterned cut-outs, around which stitching or embroidery may be applied in order to prevent the fabric from raveling.

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Facile:
    A lightweight version of ultra suede.

Facing:
    Piece of fabric sewn to the inside of a garment for lining purposes or to add structure to the garment.

Faggoting:
    1. A hem stitch with wide open stitches. 2. Open stitchwork with criss-cross or bar-like stitches across the open seam.

Faille:
    (file) Medium weight, untwilled, slightly glossy fabric in rib weave with light, flat, crosswise grain or cord made by heavy filling yarns. Used for evening dresses, etc.

Faille Crepe:
    Dressy, double-faced fabric made with high-twist poly crepe yarns.

Faille Taffeta:
    Taffeta with very visible crosswise ribs. (see also taffeta)

Faux:
    (fo) The French word for fake or false/not real, such as faux stones, faux silk, faux pockets, etc.

Felt:
    Non-woven fabric made from wool, hair, or fur.

Filigree Paisley/Paisley:
    Paisley refers to an elaborate, colorful pattern of swirls. Filigree paisley has metallic hues or threads intertwined in the paisley pattern.

Finger-tip Length:
    Length of coat or other garment which reaches to ends of fingers when arms are hanging.

Flange Shoulder:
    Shoulder with pleat, or pleats, extending over sleeve top.

Flannel:
    Medium-weight, plain or twill weave fabric that is typically made from cotton, a cotton blend, or wool. It is brushed on both sides to lift the fiber ends.

Flax:
    A natural fiber from the flax plant, it is usually combined with cotton or linen to create a crisp fabric. The higher the flax content, the stiffer the fabric.

Fleece:
    Textile with soft fleecy/furry pile.

Fleur-de-lis:
    Literally, "flower of the lily". It is a French pattern utilizing a repeated lily emblem on fabric, or a single lily.

Flocking:
    Type of raised decoration applied to the surface of fabric in which an adhesive is printed on the fabric in a specific pattern and then finely chopped fibers are applied by means of dusting or airbrushing.

Flounce:
    Gathered strip sewn to garment, lower edge often being left free. Generally found at bottom of garment or skirt.

Fly Front:
    Piece of material attached to one side. Used to conceal the fastening of garment, such as a zipper or buttons.

Foulard:
    Lightweight twill-weave fabric, made from filament yarns like silk, acetate, polyester, with a small all over print pattern on a solid background.

French Terry (under Terry Cloth):
    Medium weight, soft, cotton-type fabric with low twist yarns forming very small surface loops. The side with the loops is usually on the inside, and the smooth side faces out. It is much softer and thinner than terry cloth, which is used for towels and robes. French terry is commonly used in sportswear.

Full Button Front:
    A garment which buttons the entire length; such as a dress.

Full Elastic Waist:
    A waistline in which the elastic extends all the way around the garment.

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Gathered Yoke:
    Firm, worsted fabric, having fine diagonal rib effect on one side, with surface hard and smooth, or soft and dull. Durable closely woven fabric with definite diagonal ridges, made of wool, rayon, cotton, etc

Gathered Shoulder:
    The fabric is gathered at the shoulder seam.

Gathered Yoke:
    A yoke in which fabric is drawn in/gathered.

Gauze:
    Very light, sheer, open-construction, plain weave, cotton-type fabric. Used for dresses, curtains, bandages, etc.

Geometric Design:
    Design based on geometric shapes such as circle, squares, rectangles, triangles, etc.

Georgette:
    Light, sheer fabric with crepe surface. Usually same yarns in warp and filling.

Georgette Crepe:
    A light, sheer fabric with a crinkled surface.

Gingham:
    Lightweight, plain weave, cotton-type fabric, usually with a plaid or check pattern (gingham plaid or gingham check). Used for shirts, dresses, curtains, etc.

Godet Skirt:
    A skirt which has pieces of cloth set into the skirt at the hem line area for fullness or decoration.

Gored Skirt:
    It's the decorative holes, bound in a metal ring, on the vest and the jacket.

Grommet:
    A skirt that has set-in triangular-shaped sections, with the narrowest end at the waistband and the widest end at the hem. This is a skirt that will twirl.

Grosgrain Ribbon:
    (grow-grain) Heavy, closely woven lustrous fabric with pronounced crosswise ribs. Used for ribbons (narrow width fabric), graduation gowns, etc.

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Henley Tee:
    Any tee that has a decorative buttoned closure at the front neck.
Herringbone:
    Irregular broken twill weave. Pattern made of short slanting parallel lines adjacent to other rows slanting in reverse direction, creating a continuous v-shape design like the bones of a fish.

Hopsack:
    Made of a sturdy fabric somewhat like a coarse material for bags, used for suits, coats, etc.

Houndstooth Check:
    Variation on the twill weave construction in which a broken check effect is produced.

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Imported Fabric:
    Fabric which was made in another country.

Intarsia Knit:
    A decorative colored design knitted into a solid color fabric. The design areas are formed with their own complete stitches, rather than with miss-stitch or other techniques. Intarsia fabrics do not have a bird's eye backing. Argyle is a form of intarsia fabric.

Inverted Pleat:
    Pleat similar to box pleat in reverse.

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Jacket Dress:
    A style of dress in which the dress is attached to the jacket, or a dress and jacket designed to be worn together.

Jacquard Fabric:
    Fabric with intricate figured weave done on a jacquard loom. Process is also done with knits.

Jaspe Knit:
    A fabric that utilizes light, medium and dark threads to give the appearance of a tweed.

Jersey:
    Plain knitted, very stretchy light-medium weight fabric.

Jewel Neckline:
    Round neckline.

Johnny Collar (and/or cuffs):
    A built in collar around the neckline, mostly found in knits.

Jute:
    A natural fiber, from the jute plant. It is strong and course, and is used in making handbags and shoes.

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Keyhole Back Opening:
    Neckline which has a wedge shape opening or slit in back for ease of getting in and out of garment.

Kick Pleat:
    Pleat used to ease narrow skirt.

Knife Pleats:
    Rather narrow pleats, pressed to sharpness, usually all run the same way around the skirt.

Knit Band:
    A strip of knitted fabric, slightly stretchy, and usually ribbed. It is usually found at the waist, cuffs, or collars.

Knit-de-knit:
    Type of yarn texturizing in which a crimped yarn is made by knitting the yarn into a fabric and then heat setting the fabric. The yarn is then unraveled from the fabric and used in this permanently crinkled form.

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Lame:
    A brocaded fabric with metallic threads in the filling.

Lami:
    A man-made suede that can be cleaned. It has a similar texture to suede.

Lapel:
    The part of a garment, usually a coat or jacket, that is an extension of the collar and folds back.

Lattice:
    A framework of interwoven strips.

Linen:
    Fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. Wrinkles very easy.

Linen Blend Pants:
    A linen/rayon blend. The small percentage of rayon lessons the inevitable linen wrinkles, but it still gives the appearance of a rich linen.

Lucite:
    Clear acrylic plastic material, usually used in shoes or jewelry. In shoes, it softens as it warms up to the temperature of the shoe to more comfortably mold itself to the shape of the wearer's foot.

Lurex Thread:
    Trade name for a yarn made with bright aluminum foil inserted between two pieces of colored plastic film. It is woven or knit into fabrics for highlights.

Lycra:
    A DuPont trademark for its spandex fiber.

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Macrame:
    A design formed by knots.

Madras:
    Lightweight plain weave cotton fabric with a striped plaid, or checked pattern.

Mandarin Collar:
    Narrow standing collar in close neckline.

Matelasse:
    Ornamented by means of an imitation or suggestion of quilting, the surface being marked by depressed lines which form squares or lozenges in relief; as, matelasse silks.

Matte Finish:
    Dull finish, with unglazed, often roughened surface.

Matte Jersey:
    A dull, flat knit fabric made of fine crepe yarns.

Melange:
    In the dictionary this is defined as a medley. In our case, it's what D&D has named the fabric, which uses irregular polyester yarns to create a woven, textured effect that avoids wrinkles. It is a value-added feature.

Melton:
    A heavyweight, dense, compacted, and tightly woven wool or wool blend fabric.

Mesh Lace:
    Knitted or woven fabric in an open weave, producing a net or screen-like effect.

Microfiber:
    A man-made fabric created of very fine fibers, thinner than those of a silkworm's web. These fabrics are the result of the most current technology. They are wrinkle resistant and very soft.

Mock Pockets:
    See faux pockets.

Mock Turtleneck:
    A neckline similar to a turtleneck, but with a collar that extends only partially up the neck, roughly 1 1/2".

Modal:
    A generic category of manufactured fibers that have a greater ability to retain their shape when wet as well as high breaking strength.

Mohair:
    Long, lustrous, silky hair of the Angora goat. It is used alone in sweaters, and combined with other fibers in jackets, coats and sweaters.

Moiré:
    Corded fabric, usually made from silk or one of the manufactured fibers, which has a distinctive watermarked wavy pattern on the face of the fabric.

Molded Silk:
    Silk which has been formed into a shape.

Mother-of-Pearl:
    It comes from the hard shiny inner surface of a pearl oyster.

Motif:
    The theme of a garment of fabric print provided by specific elements of the design.

Muslin:
    Inexpensive, medium weight, plain weave cotton sheeting fabric.

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Nainsook:
    Lightweight plain weave cotton fabric, usually finished to create a luster and a soft hand.

Ninon:
    Lightweight, plain weave, made of silk or manufactured fibers, with an open mesh-like appearance.

Non-waisted:
    Refers to a dress which does not have a waistline.

Notched Collar:
    Collar applied so as to leave a notch at joining.

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Ombre:
    Material with multiple colored, striped background, in which the stripes of colors are made to fade into each other giving the garment a softer look.

Organdy:
    A stiffened, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count.

Organza:
    Sheer, fine, crisp fabric.

Ottoman Rib Knit:
    A double knit fabric having pronounced ribs or rolls across the width of the fabric.

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Paisley:
    A tear-drop shaped, fancy printed pattern.

Panel:
    Used to describe a feature of design. Usually front gore of a dress, jacket or blouse.

Panne Velvet:
    Velvet fabric in which the surface pile is flattened in one direction.

Paper Taffeta:
    Lightweight taffeta with crisp finish. (see also taffeta)

Patch Pocket:
    A piece of material which is sewn on outside of garment to form a pocket.

Peachskin:
    Soft finish of a fabric that feels much like the skin of a peach.

Peau de Soie:
    (po-deh-sw) Heavy, twill-weave, satin-effect, luxurious, silk-like fabric.

Pebble Georgette:
    Heavy, sheer crepe fabric with a rough, pebble-like (or granite-like) effect on the face of the fabric.

Percale:
    Medium weight, plain weave, low to medium count cotton-like fabric.

Perforated:
    This refers to the patterned holes..

Peter Pan Collar:
    Rounded edge, turned down collar.

Pintucks:
    Tiny tucks (raised, decorative seams). They're called "pintucks" because the "tuck" is just large enough to go over the bump of a straight pin. They can be used for shaping and/or decoration.

Pinwale Rib Texture:
    A very narrow ridge or rib in a fabric (ex. Pinwale Corduroy)

Piping:
    Narrow cord used as finish on edges. Also sewn into seams for decorations.

Pique:
    Medium weight, cotton-type fabric with raised nubby design. Some patterns used are cords, waffle-weave, and bird's eye. Commonly used for women's and children's wear, collars and cuffs.

Placket:
    Opening in the upper part of a dress, shirt or skirt, to allow ease in putting the garment on. The smooth placket cover is often used to hide buttons or zippers, and therefore present a smoother surface.

Pleat:
    Fold of fabric laid back flat, usually lengthwise fabric. Made singly or in groups for decoration or to hold in width of garment.

Plisse:
    Lightweight, plain weave, puckered striped, cotton-type fabric. Slightly resembles a seersucker. Used for dresses, summer pajamas, etc.

Pointelle:
    A rib fabric utilizing transfer stitches to create selective openings in a fabric.

Polo:
    Informal shirt or blouson with collar and placket.

Polyester:
    A manufactured fiber that has high strength, excellent resiliency, and high abrasion resistance. Low absorbency allows the fiber to dry quickly.

Pongee:
    The most common form is a naturally colored lightweight, plain weave, silk-like fabric.

Ponte di Roma Knit:
    A double-knit fabric, usually produced in monotone. The fabric is very stretchy and has a slight horizontal stripe texture.

Poplin:
    Medium weight, cotton-type fabric with fine horizontal ribs. Usually a solid color.

Princess Seam:
    A seam measuring from the bust to just above the hips providing delicate shaping to a dress.

Pull over:
    Garment that pulls over the head.

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Quilted:
    Stitched in lines or patterns.

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Raglan Sleeve:
    Sleeve with long armhole line extending to neckline.

Ramie:
    A strong, but soft, fiber from the inner bark of the ramie plant. It is similar to rayon, but it is natural. Another name for ramie is rhea, which is Indian for ramie.

Raschel Knit:
    A warp knitted fabric in which the resulting knit fabric resembles hand crocheted fabrics, and lace fabrics.

Ratine:
    (rat-l-nay) Loosely woven fabrics in which the crosswise threads are looped to produce a rough, uneven weave.

Raw Silk:
    Fiber spun from silkworm cocoons.

Rayon:
    General term used for a number of textile fibers and fabrics made by man.

Rhinestone:
    An artificial gem of hard glass, usually cut in imitation of a diamond.

Rib:
    Raised ridge, either horizontal, vertical or diagonal in textile fabrics, formed by heavier yarns.

Rib-knit:
    Produces lines of wales on both sides of the fabric.

Roll Collar:
    Standing turned over collar.

Roll Cuff:
    Cuff which is turned over once or several times.

Rouched:
    Gathered and puckered smocking

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Sanded Silk:
    Silk noile fabric that has been processed to give it a soft, smooth feeling. Very nice to the touch.

Sateen:
    Medium weight, cotton-type fabric with a satin weave and a semi-lustrous surface. It is used for uniforms, slacks, shoe uppers, etc.

Satin Bound:
    Edges of a seam covered with a satin binding for a smooth finish.

Satin Fabric:
    Traditional fabric utilizing a satin weave construction to achieve a lustrous fabric surface.

Scallop:
    Circular curve or projection, usually made in series along an edge such as a scalloped hem.

Schiffli Embroidery:
    Machine-done embroidery. A machine produces a continuous embroidery pattern on the fabric.

Scoop Neck:
    Rounded neckline providing modest coverage.

Seersucker:
    Lightweight, cotton-type, color striped fabric. Also with permanent, lengthwise, alternating, puckered striped and flat sections. Used for dresses, sport jackets, etc.

Self Belt:
    Belt made of the same material as the garment.

Sensensual:
    Soft, woven, silky polyester.

Sequin:
    Metal disk or spangle used for trimming.

Serge:
    Fabric with a smooth hand that is created by a two-up, two-down twill weave.

Set In:
    To stitch a small part within a larger part.

Shantung:
    Medium weight, plain weave, silk-like fabric. Used for dresses, etc.

Sharkskin:
    A smooth crisp fabric with a dull finish made usually of rayon in basket weave.

Shawl Collar:
    The collar and lapel are cut in a curve, without any notches. It usually extends around the neck and at least half way down to the waistband.

Sheath Dress:
    A close-fitting, straight dress, similar to a chemise. This one has shaping darts at the bust.

Shell:
    Pull-on short or cap sleeve blouse usually worn under a bomber, big shirt, etc.

Shirring:
    Three or more rows of gathers. Shirring is often used at the yoke to add fullness in the bodice.

Shirt Dress:
    Dress which features characteristics of a shirt such as collars, cuffs and front closing.

Shirttail Hem:
    The hem is not straight around. It is like a men's shirt hem, with curved hems front and back.

Shotbead Detail:
    Flat, nailhead beads that randomly overlay the floral pattern.

Side Seam Pockets:
    A style of pocket along the side seam of garment. Found in pants, skirts and jackets.

Side Slits:
    Narrow opening on sides of garment at hemline to ease movement.

Silhouette:
    A solid outline drawing. In this case, the slenderizing outline, or "silhouette" is very flattering.

Silk Noile:
    Short fibers that result from the spun-silk yarn process. These short fibers are usually mixed in with longer staple fibers to make yarn. When spun they are very uneven and lumpy.

Silk Shantung:
    A medium-weight, plain weave fabric, characterized by a ribbed effect, resulting from slubbed yarns used in the warp. Translation: a rich, textured silk with a slight sheen that changes tone as the light source changes. It is beautiful and luxurious, and in this case, hand washable.

Single Breasted:
    Garment which closes down the center front with enough overlap for a single row of buttons.

Slash Pockets:
    Pockets in which the opening is cut at a diagonal.

Sleeveless:
    Shell without sleeves similar to cap sleeves.

Smocked:
    Decorative stitching holding fullness in a regular pattern. This is often done with elastic thread for bands on blouses or cuffs.

Soft Pleats:
    Pleats which are not pressed down.

Soufflé Knit:
    Very lightweight, airy knit fabric.

Soutache Braid Trim:
    Narrow, rounded, decorative braid of silk or rayon used for borders and in all-over ornamental patterns. (soo-tash)

Spandex Fiber:
    Manufactured elastomeric fiber that can be repeatedly stretched over 500% without breaking, and will still recover to its original length.

Split Neckline:
    Neckline in which there is a short slit in the front for added detail.

Split Vamp:
    The vamp of a shoe is the piece that covers the crown of the foot. In this case, it has a notch cut into it for comfort and style.

Step-In Dress:
    A dress which there is a short slit in the front for added detail.

Stovepipe:
    Type of slim cut straight legged pants that are characterized by the absence of any sort of front seam.

Sueded:
    1. Leather with a soft napped surface. 2. Fabric with a surface resembling that of suede

Surah:
    Lightweight, lustrous twill weave constructed fabric with a silk-like hand.

Surplice:
    Garment that overlaps diagonally in front.

Sweetheart Neckline:
    Low cut neckline curved in heart shape.

Swing Coat:
    Circular or gored coat, cut so as to give a swinging motion as wearer walks.

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Taffeta:
    Medium weight, plain weave, lustrous fabric, made with filament yarns. Slight crosswise ribs. Fabric has a great rustle sound when rubbed. Used for dresses, women's suits, etc.

Tank-style:
    Generally used in reference to a sleeveless dress.

Tapered:
    Decreasing down side; said of pant legs, sleeves or other silhouettes.

Tapestry:
    Fabric with pattern woven in by way of colored, crosswise threads.

Tencel:
    A remarkable fiber which gives clothing outstanding performance, extraordinary comfort, luxurious feel, and full-bodied drape. It is a natural fiber harvested from managed tree farms and processed in a unique and environmentally sound manner.

Terry Cloth:
    Medium weight, soft, cotton-type fabric with low-twist yarns forming surface loops.

Texture:
    Surface quality of cloth or manner of weaving.

Textured Rayon Crepe:
    Having slight pebbly texture, made by weave, embossing or application of chemicals.

Thai Silk:
    A type of silk that has a texture to it, with raw silk knubs and slubs.

Threadwork:
    A D&D term that refers to the long threads that hold the pieces of the garment together.

Three Quarter Length:
    As applied to a sleeve: length coming slightly nearer the wrist than the elbow. (Three quarters of the way down the arm.) As applied to a coat: length shorter than a dress by about one quarter of its length.

Tiered:
    A series of rows arranged one above or behind another.

Tissue Faille:
    Lightweight faille. (see also faille)

Tissue Taffeta:
    Lightweight, transparent taffeta.

Toile:
    Light/medium weight, plain weave, fine, cotton-type fabric, usually with one colored printed scenic design.

Tonal:
    Although there may be several depths and intensities of a color shade in an outfit, they will go together in a pleasing way because the same color tone is used at the base of all the pieces.

Top-Stitched:
    Decorative stitching, often in a contrasting color, that is sewn on the outside of a seam. This stitching can be on one side of the seam, or on both.

Topiary:
    Traditionally, a bush trimmed to a specific shape. For our purposes, it refers to the image of geometrically-designed pots of tall greenery and flowers in the fabric pattern.

Trapunto Stitching:
    The design is outlined with stitching then filled with cotton to give a raised effect.

Tuck:
    Fold of fabric that is stitched in place. Used as decoration, means of holding fullness.

Tunic:
    (too-nik) A long top, over-blouse or coat. The bottom hem usually falls at the hipline or lower.

Tussah-look:
    Tussah is a name for wild silk (as opposed to cultivated silk worm cocoons) raised anywhere in the world. Compared to traditional silk, it is more uneven.

Tweed:
    Rough surface material giving homespun effect, in plain twill or herringbone twill weave. Yarn is usually dyed before weaving and tweed is woven in two or more

Twin Print:
    Print fabrics designed to be used in combination with one another.

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Urethane:
    A synthetic material. (Man-made leather.)

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Vamp:
    The part of a shoe or boot that covers the instep and sometimes extends over the toes.

Velour:
    Medium weight, cotton-type, dense, cut pile fabric that resembles velvet. Used for sportswear, drapes, upholstery, etc. (2)-knitted velour: fabric with a soft, downy, suede-like face, somewhat resembling velveteen, but softer and more flexible.

Velvet:
    Fabric with short, soft, thick, pile surface of looped warp yarns and plain back.

Velvet, Crushed:
    Velvet processed to have an irregular surface.

Velvet, Cut:
    Fabric having brocaded pattern of velvet on a background of chiffon, georgette or voile.

Velveteen:
    Medium weight, cotton-type fabric with cut pile surface that "lies flat". Used for dresses, robes, etc.

V-Neck:
    Neckline shaped in the form of the letter "V".

Viscose:
    Manufactured fiber made of regenerated cellulose. It's soft, absorbent and drapes well.

Voile:
    Plain, fine, transparent or semi-transparent fabric.

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Weft:
    The woof of cloth; the threads that cross the warp from selvage to selvage; the thread carried by the shuttle in weaving.

Weskit-look:
    Resembling a waist coat; vest.

Wool Crepe:
    A woolen fabric with a "crepe", or crinkled, texture.

Worsted Fabric:
    Tightly woven fabric made by using only long staple, combed wool or wool blend yarns. Fabric has a hard, smooth surface.

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Yoke:
    Fitted portion of garment, usually over the shoulder or hips, to which the rest of the garment is sewn.

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